My name is Daniel Bernardes and during this Google Summer of Code I am working on the new Timeline interface.

Dynamic graphs have been the subject of increasing interest, given their potential as a theoretical model and their promising applications. Following this trend, Gephi has incorporated tools to study dynamic networks. From a visualization perspective, a critical tool is the Timeline component, which allows users to select pertinent time intervals and display and explore the corresponding graph. The challenge concerning the timeline was twofold: redesign the component to improve user experience and add extra features and introduce an animation scheme with the possibility to export the resulting video.

Together with my mentors Cezary Bartosiak and Sébastien Heymann, we have proposed a new design for the timeline component featuring a sparkline chart in the background of the interval selection drawer (which is semi transparent): this feature will help the user to focus on particular moments of the evolution of the dynamic graph, like bursts of connections or changes in graph density or other simple graph metrics. Current metrics are the evolution of the number of nodes, the number of edges and the graph density. The sparkline chart was preferred to other chart solutions because it does not add too much visual pollution to the component and adds to the qualitative analysis. The interaction with the drawer remains globally the same of the old timeline, to guarantee a smooth transition for the user.

To implement this feature we have used the chart library JFreeChart (a library already incorporated to Gephi), customizing their XYPlot into a Sparkline chart by modifying their visual attributes. To display the Sparkine, one needs to measure the properties of the graph in several time instants of the global time frame where the dynamic graph exists. This represented a major challenge, since the original architecture did not allow the timeline component to access (and measure) the graph in particular instants of time; the solution was to introduce a slight modification to the DynamicGraph API to provide an object which gave us snapshots of the graph at given instants. Other challenges we dealt with included the automatic selection/switching of real number/time units in the timeline (depending on the nature of the graph in question) and sampling granularity of the timeline.

Another breakthrough of this project was the introduction of the timeline animation. Once the user has selected a time frame with the drawer it can make it slide as the corresponding graph is being displayed on the screen. Besides the technical aspects of interaction between the timeline and the animation controller, there were also an effort to calibrate the animation (ie, in terms of speed and frames) so it would be comfortable and meaningful for the user.

As far as the UI is concerned, the component has gained a new “Reset” button next to the play button which activates the timeline drawer and displays the chart. It also serves to reset the drawer selection to the full interval when the timeline is active. The play button gained its original function, that is, to control the animation of the timeline — instead of activating the selection.

Finally, the animation export to a video format revealed to be more tricky than expected and couldn’t be finished as planned. There were several setbacks to this feature, beginning with the selection of a convenient library to write de movie container: it turns out that the de facto options available are not fully Java-based and need an encoder working in the background. The best alternative I found was Xuggler, which is based on ffmpeg. Also, obtaining screen captures of the graph to were a little bit tricky so I have exported SVG images from the graph corresponding to each frame, converted them to jpeg and than encoded them though Xuggler to a video format. As one might expect, this solution is not very efficient in terms of time, so Mathieu Bastien and my mentors suggested me to wait for the new features from the new Visualization API that would make this process simpler.

In addition to current bugfixes and minor improvements concerning the timeline and the animation, the movie export remains the the next big step to close this project. If you have questions or suggestion, please do not hesitate! The new timeline will be available in the next release of Gephi.

DB

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6 comments feed

  1. 1
    Clement

    Great work obviously. I’d have one question: will it be possible to select the time frame more precisely than just with the mouse, as it is the case now?

    Also, I find great the work on the sparkline, I see it as a first step towards dynamic metrics!

    Thx for the hard work!

    Clement

  2. 2
    Erwan Demairy

    Hello,
    I was unsuccesful to see the timeline animation with the launchpad last version : I was expecting to see the graph animate when pressing the “play” (Right arrow) button, but nothing happens. Is there some video showing the new tiimeline capacities?
    I use Gephi on Linux, is it the platform on which this extension was developped?
    Best regards,
    Erwan

  3. 3
    Sebastien Heymann

    Hi,

    The new Timeline is not integrated yet as it still requires some debugging. Stay tuned :)

  4. 4
    Håkan Jonsson

    Really looking forward to this feature.

  5. 5
    brian

    Is this work finished? How about the animation export? Thx.

  6. 6
    Sebastien Heymann

    No animation export for the moment, as we are in an intensive re-write of the Graph API.

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